Olympic Gold Medal Marketing Strategies (Part 4): The Goals, Milestones and Metrics Triathlon

All marketers can learn from the dedication, preparation and planning of Olympic athletes. This series of posts will put that into perspective when preparing your own marketing plan. Here are the posts in this 5-part series: Part 1 – Competitive Analysis: remove obstacles like a judo champion Part 2- Targeting Markets: zeroing in on your customer like an olympic archer Part 3 – Unique Selling Propositions: what artistic gymnastics teach you about execution Part 4 – Goals, Milestones and Metrics: the triathlon of marketing measurement Part 5- Tactics: sink or swim by using the right Olympic strokes Today, we talk about setting goals, milestones and metrics that can help you win in your campaign like a triathlete. Goals, Milestones and Metrics: The Triathlon of Marketing Measurement Perhaps nothing in the Olympics is more grueling than the Triathlon. Triathlon races combine swimming, cycling and running, in that order. … The race is completed from start to finish, with no breaks. The transitions between the swim, the bike and the run are part of the race – crucial seconds can be gained or lost in the transition area. Triathletes are all around champions. They need strong tactical ability to win. Setting goals, measuring progress and having a clear sense of what you will train when are the essential pieces to being an effective competitor in this event. When it comes to marketing, the triathlon that often separates success from failure, involves goals, metrics and timelines. I will be the first to admit that I am not the strongest “numbers guy” – my passion falls squarely into the creation and networking realm....

Time Hacking: How to Work Smarter in Social Media

Clay Shirkey, author of “Here Comes Everybody,” posted this great article in 2008 explaining the phenomenon of social media. It’s not a primer about Facebook or why people should use Linkedin, rather he talks about how traditional media folks still don’t really get it. Sure, they understand that these tools and being in these spaces can help their projects move forward (I don’t think there is an HBO show out there without a blog), but the question in their minds remains: where do people find the time? Shirkey goes on to talk about television, the great distraction. He said if you then take the creation of something as vast as Wikipedia and look at it as a unit as of 2008, all of the content, edits, pages, and comments crowd-sourced on Wikipedia had taken 100 million thought hours to create. Where do people find the time? The thought hour surplus from watching television in the United States in a single year: 200 Billion thought hours (“that’s 2000 Wikipedia projects per year”). Imagine if we could harness the power of those wasted hours, “unwinding” in front of meaningless stories crafted to capture our attention towards a bit of advertising that most people cut out via TIVO (don’t worry – they’ll still get you via product placement and in-show ads – ever wonder why so many people in movies and on TV have Apple computers?). It reminds me of an R.A. Lafferty short story that I once read called, “Polity and Customs of the Camiroi,” where a board of education visits a distant advanced civilization called “Camiroi.” In this culture, children...

Understanding Alexa Ratings: A Grading System for Websites

As you get more comfortable with posting and promoting your blog, some questions will come up: How does my site rate against others like it? Who is coming to my site? Where are they coming from? These are great questions to ask and can help you formulate goals for your blog if you don’t already have them.  Now, if you want to get really serious, I suggest becoming a master in Google Analytics.  But to start simple, try using Alexa. What Is Alexa? According to their about section, Alexa started in 1996 as a web analytics, navigation, and intelligence company.  They also produced a toolbar for people to get this information straight from their browser, which has been downloaded millions of times.  They continue to index and rank sites based on number of visitors and page views.  Whoever has the most wins. And this is where Alexa can get confusing.  What does it mean to be ranked in the millions?  What about the 10,000s?  Of course the top 100 is self explanatory, but what follows is a grading system I use for myself to put Alexa numbers in context.  It runs from 1 to 10 with 10 being the best. 10 – top 100 9 – top 1K and 100 8 – btw 10K and 1K 7 – btw10K and 50K 6- btw 50K and 100K 5 – btw 100K and 500K 4 – btw 1M and 500K 3 – btw 1M and 10M 2 – btw 100M and 10M 1 – over 100M or not ranked Rather than saying a website is ranked 5,556,000 I can say “it...